Inspired by a pair of archive
diggers
in other industries, I recently took a spin through the New York Times now-free
online archive. (NOTE: It’s not entirely free; see comments below.)

Armed with search terms like "magazine" (81,099 results since
1981), "Internet" and "Graydon Carter," here are a selection of results—some
dated, others oddly prescient:

January 1, 1981: Earliest result in archive for "magazine."

Mr. Shafir also came under fire when he defended assigning a
plainclothesman caught taping a closed news briefing given by the ministry’s
Police Division. The taping was said to be for a police magazine.

July 1, 1981: The return of Vanity Fair.

ADVERTISING; Vanity Fair’s Return Set

For the last 45 years, the only sign of Vanity Fair
magazine, the sophisticated darling of the Roaring Twenties, was the monthly
notation on the spine of Vogue that said: ”Vogue (Incorporating Vanity
Fair).”

It was the Condé Nast Publications’ way of protecting its
copyright against the day it might resurrect Vanity Fair.

Now, following the success of its new Self magazine, the
company says the day has come, and that the magazine of ”wit and critical
intelligence” that sparkled for 22 years before dying in the cold of the
Depression, will return as a monthly in January 1983.

The initial circulation of the new Vanity Fair has been set
at 250,000. The cover price will be $2.50. No publisher has been selected yet
but there is an editor in chief, Richard Locke, currently deputy editor of The
New York Times Book Review.

January 31, 1981: "Falwell Wins Court Curb On Penthouse
Distribution"

Federal Judge James C. Turk today prohibited Penthouse
magazine from distributing its March issue at the request of the Rev. Jerry
Falwell, the founder of Moral Majority, who says a Penthouse interview with him
was obtained by deceit.

September 8, 1984: "Anna Wintour Is Wed To a Child
Psychiatrist"

Anna Wintour, creative director at Vogue magazine, was
married yesterday to Dr. David Shaffer, chief of the child psychiatry
department at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and the New York State
Psychiatric Institute. Judge Elliott Wilk of New York City Civil Court
performed the ceremony at the couple’s Manhattan home.

The bride, who has retained her name, is a daughter of
Elinor Wintour and Charles Wintour of London. She was formerly a senior editor
at New York magazine and deputy fashion editor at Harper’s & Queen magazine
in London. She attended Queen College in London.

August 15, 1987: "WINTOUR LEAVING BRITISH VOGUE FOR HOUSE & GARDEN"

Anna Wintour, the editor who changed British Vogue from a
quirky, insular fashion magazine to a slicker international publication, is
coming back to New York to become editor in chief of House & Garden
magazine. She starts Sept. 9. ”I’ve missed New York terribly,” Miss Wintour
said yesterday in a telephone interview from London.

Anna Wintour, the editor who changed British Vogue from a
quirky, insular fashion magazine to a slicker international publication, is
coming back to New York to become editor in chief of House & Garden magazine.
She starts Sept. 9. ”I’ve missed New York terribly,” Miss Wintour said
yesterday in a telephone interview from London. ”I’m enormously looking
forward to coming back.” Her new job is not her only cause for celebration.
Two weeks ago, Miss Wintour, who is married to Dr. David Shaffer of New York
City, gave birth to their second child, a daughter named Kate.

November 2, 1987: First appearance of Spy magazine.

Honing the Rapier to Skewer Yuppies

First came the horror stories of
young stockbrokers too poor or shaken to order radicchio and warm goat cheese
salads at their favorite track-lighted restaurants. Then came the jokes: What’s
the difference between a 28-year-old arbitrager and a pigeon? At least the
pigeon can still make a deposit on a BMW.

By now, it seems, it is open
season on yuppies in New York City. (For camouflage, some are rumored to be
scratching the Ferragamo signatures from their shoes.) Recently, some of the
more trenchant observers of the New York scene were invited to indulge in a
little yuppie-bashing. They seemed eager to oblige.

”It’s fun to look into their
eyes in the subways,” said E. Graydon Carter, co-editor of Spy magazine, which
has made just about every identifiable group in the city an object of its
biting sarcasm. ”It’s nice to see the overdogs getting their ears clipped a
bit.”

April 17, 1990: "Lack of Ads Kills 7 Days Magazine"

Just two years after it was
started with great fanfare, 7 Days magazine has ceased publishing.

In a tense meeting yesterday at
the weekly’s newly renovated offices in lower Manhattan, the publication’s owner,
Leonard N. Stern, told the staff that even though 7 Days covered New York
City’s social and political happenings in a ”stylish and provocative” way, it
could not generate the advertising support it needed to survive.

October 22, 1990: "Media Market Languishes as Buyers
Disappear"

July 13, 1992: "Vanity Fair Is Hot Property, But Profit Is Open Question"

Vanity Fair may be the hottest magazine on the market, but
does it make money? For all that has been written about the monthly magazine
that Tina Brown led to prominence before being named editor of The New Yorker,
almost nothing has been said about its profitability.

January 25, 1993: "Vanity Fair Is Doing Nicely, But Out
of the Spotlight"

February 9, 1994: "Spy Magazine Can’t Find Buyer, and
Closes"